Gimmick 嵐
neuromorphogenesis:

To quash depression, some brain cells must push through the stress
The nature of psychological resilience has, in recent years, been a subject of enormous interest to researchers, who have wondered how some people endure and even thrive under a certain amount of stress, and others crumble and fall prey to depression. The resulting research has underscored the importance of feeling socially connected and the value of psychotherapy to identify and exercise patterns of thought that protect against hopelessness and defeat.
But what does psychological resilience look like inside our brains, at the cellular level? Such knowledge might help bolster peoples’ immunity to depression and even treat people under chronic stress. And a new study published Thursday in Science magazine has made some progress in the effort to see the brain struggling with — and ultimately triumphing over — stress.
A group of neuroscientists at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine in New York focused on the dopaminergic cells in the brain’s ventral tegmentum, a key node in the brain’s reward circuitry and therefore an important place to look at how social triumph and defeat play out in the brain. In mice under stress because they were either chronically isolated or rebuffed or attacked by fellow littermates, the group had observed that this group of neurons become overactive.
It would logically follow, then, that if you don’t want stressed mice (or people) to become depressed, you would want to avoid hyperactivity in that key group of neurons, right?
Actually, wrong, the researchers found. In a series of experiments, they saw that the mice who were least prone to behave in socially defeated ways when under stress were actually the ones whose dopaminergic cells in the ventral tegmental area displayed the greatest levels of hyperactivity in response to stress. And that hyperactivity was most pronounced in the neurons that extended from the tegmentum into the nearby nucleus accumbens, also a key node in the brain’s reward system.
The researchers wondered whether inducing similar hyperactivity in mice prone to depression — effectively pushing these cells to signal even faster and harder — might help bolster them against succumbing to passivity and defeat when under stress? Using antidepressant medication, viruses and lights that turn circuits on and off, they found that it could. By activating the chemical processes that induced the same level of hyperactivity seen in the ventral tegmenta of resilient mice, they made depression-prone mice more hardy and happy in the face of stress.
The results suggest something profound about the brain and depression: that in the healthy and psychologically resilient, stress induces its own chemical countermeasures, fostering a sort of psychological equilibrium. Someday medications might employ strategies that help promote such equilibrium to head off depression before it starts, as well as to treat it once it has set in.
Man, I love that one Disney movie

marauders4evr:

That opens up with chanting in a different language

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With the royal family

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And the adorable children

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And the tragic death(s)

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And then our hero runs away

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And sings a really catchy song about being free

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Without realizing that the kingdom is in ruins

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And is being ruled by a villain who wants to be king

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A villain who is really good at causing guilt trips

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And so our hero goes back

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And they all live happily ever after

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It’s such a great movie

(via cheetohpuffscheetoh)

  1. If you like someone, wait.
  2. Give lots of compliments, even if you’re shy. Everyone else is too.
  3. Change. Get a haircut, try new perfume, get new sheets. Become better than you were before.
  4. Eat healthier. Learn to cook something fancy.
  5. Get up earlier and watch the sun come up.
  6. Wear soft clothes, take a bath, drink something warm.
  7. Meet someone new, even just a friend.
  8. Become closer with your friends and your family. Call your mother. Cry with your best friend. Tell everyone how much you appreciate them.
  9. Keep your room clean. Buy some candles. Let the natural light in.
  10. Make a list of reasons why you’ll be better off without them. Believe they are true, because they are.
  11. Listen to new music.
  12. Write everything you’re thinking and feeling. Write letters. Write happy letters, sad letters, and angry letters, even if you’re never going to send them.
  13. It’s okay to be sad, but not forever. Sadness is not as beautiful as music makes it seem. Lack of sleep makes your eyes droopy, not deep. Wake up every morning and tell yourself you’re going to have a good day.
  14. Go to the library. Don’t forget to look in the music section.
  15. Remove them from your life. Get rid of the things they gave you if they make you sad. They’re not worth it. You will never be happy if you continue to hold on to the things that make you sad.
  16. Make new memories.
  17. Try to find something to appreciate in everything you do or experience.
  18. Being alone is okay, you don’t have to surround yourself with people.
  19. Become your own best friend. Buy yourself coffee and drink it alone in a cafe. Take your time.
  20. Learn to love every bit of yourself.
How to feel better and become better by me  (via seabelle)

(Source: skinnyknees, via cheetohpuffscheetoh)

happiest:

do u ever wonder what a famous person is doing at this very moment in time

(via cheetohpuffscheetoh)

vipyr:

YAAAAAAS DRAG HER SIS YAAAAASSSS
People wait
all week for friday,
all year for summer,
all life for happiness. (via topkun)

(Source: sensitizes, via missaiba)

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